Olivery News

H4 - Heddie the Olive Tree in March March 03, 2014 11:11

Kalamata Olive Tree Telegraph Hill H4

Here is a picture from today of Kalamata Olive tree 'H4' or 'Heddie' as Eddie its owner likes to call it.  We are pleased to report that this tree is flourishing.  You can see the new growth rising 600mm above the stump.

Eddie has chosen well! 

The next picture is of F8, our 'slow starter'.  Transplanted in October at the same time as the rest of the trees, this tree is the last to sprout.  You can just see on the right hand side of the tree a small shoot - approx 20mm long. 

Kalamata Olive tree Telegraph Hill

This is especially pleasing as it means we had a 100% success rate with the transplanted trees.


Grove update Eddie checks his tree February 10, 2014 16:07

Telegraph Hill Kalamata Olive treeEddie is our youngest olive tree adopter.  His recent visit (Oct 2013) was soon after our transplanting of the Kalamata Olives.  We tracked his tree from its old location to new.  It has a new number (H4) and Eddie has appropriately named it 'Heddie'.

We gave Eddie the choice of new tree but he chose to stay with this one.  Well done Eddie we like your loyalty!

We are pleased to report that 33 of the 34 transplanted trees are growing well with plenty of new growth.  One has not sprouted yet, but we are remaining positive!

Kalamata Olive Telegraph Hill

 

'Heddie' at 31 December 2014, some sprouts coming....

If your tree has moved we will let you know your new number with March packages.  

Remember we have a product guarantee - we guarantee your products even in a bad year (and this will be a bad year for 'Heddie' & other transplanted olive trees)

All march packages will contain 6 pouches of yummy olives.

 

 


On the Olive Grove December 24, 2013 09:55

Telegraph Hill Kalamata Olives regrowth

What's up on the grove?.  

We've had one of the best springs for 25 years.  It has been warm, regular rain and gentle winds.  This has facilitated a fantastic fruit set on the trees.  (Fruit set is a terms used for the conversion of flowers to fruit.)  so things so far are looking good.  The last couple of weeks have had some severe Hail storms in the Hawke's Bay.  This has damaged some fruit crops.  We have been lucky in that they have missed our olive groves.

The transplanted Kalamata Olives (right) are starting to grow with little shoots starting to come away.  We are keeping up the water to these stumps, as they can very easily dry out.

The Villas grove (below) has now has two years of growth from the 'reset' prune we did.  Here is the comparison pictures.  We will get some fruit off these trees this year.  But not from the tree the sheep have eaten! (front right of picture).

   


Transplanting Kalamata Olive Trees November 15, 2013 08:56

Time will tell whether this was a good decision or not.  I've moved every second Kalamata tree to increase the space it has to grow, so that it will grow larger, produce more fruit and be happier!

Telegraph Hill Olive tree transplantFirst we had to chop the tops off them.

Olive tree transplanting at Telegraph HillThis ones ready to move.  We labelled each one to keep track of the adopted trees

Olive tree transplanting at Telegraph HillDig them up with a digger.

 

Olive tree transplanting at Telegraph HillPlant them in pre dug holes. 

 

Olive tree transplanting at Telegraph HillSome water and this olive tree is ready to grow. 

 

Olive tree transplanting at Telegraph HillUnfortunately some didn't make it.  This one we ring barked so we decided to chop off right at the base. It should still grow. 


It's raining Kalamata Olives June 13, 2013 11:22

Once a year we get to see this sight.  I love my Kalamata olives!


Kalamata olive grafts March 11, 2013 11:26

You can clearly see the graft splicing into the existing trunk and branches.  It looks to be a good bond.  The bond will be tested in the years ahead as the branch gains weight and volume.

This is year three for these Kalamata grafts.  It has been two and a half years since they were grafted, so this year is the first fruit. While its only a small quantity on this graft it is a promising start.

Interestingly another graft tree has grown faster than this one it is three meters tall.  It has no fruit this year.  Our theory as to why? It has been happily putting energy into growing tree rather than fruit.  Quite why it chose to do this is another theory again!